VOICING BELONGING: TRADITIONAL SINGING IN A GLOBALIZED WORLD (JIVS 2.2)

We are pleased to announce the publication of issue 2.2 of the Journal of Interdisciplinary Voice Studies, a special issue on the topic of ‘Voicing Belonging: Traditional Singing in a Globalized World’ co-edited by Konstantinos Thomaidis (University of Exeter, UK) and Virginie Magnat (University of British Columbia, Canada).

 

CONTENTS

A DIPHONIC EDITORIAL

Voicing belonging: Traditional singing in a globalized world

by Konstantinos Thomaidis and Virginie Magnat

 

ARTICLES

Constructing the singing voice: Vocal style, aesthetics and the body in Okinawan music

by Matt Gillan

South Indian singing, digital dissemination and belonging in London’s Tamil diaspora

by Jasmine Hornabrook

Singing the nation: Contemporary Greek rebetiko performance as carnivalesque

by Yona Stamatis

The transmission of voicing in traditional Gwoka: Between identity and memory

by Marie Tahon and Pierre-Eugène Sitchet

 

VOICINGS

Maud’s Song and Heraclitus’s Logos: Journal fragments

by Maria Gaitanidi

Songs of tradition as training in higher education?

by Ditte Berkeley-Schultz and Electa Behrens

 

REVIEWS

VoicEncounters, Wrocław, the Grotowski Institute, 14–24 April 2016, reviewed by Konstantinos Thomaidis

The 21st-Century Voice: Contemporary and Traditional Extra-Normal Voice, 2nd ed., Michael Edward Edgerton (2015) Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, reviewed by Robert O. Beahrs

Vocal Music and Contemporary Identities: Unlimited Voices in East Asia and the West, Christian Utz and Frederick Lau (eds) (2013) New York and London: Routledge, reviewed by Huyn Kyong Hannah Chang

Korean Musical Drama: P’ansori and the Making of Tradition in Modernity, Haekyung Um (2013) Farnham: Ashgate, reviewed by Tara McAllister-Viel

The Voice in the Drum: Music, Language, and Emotion in Islamicate South Asia, Richard K. Wolf (2014) Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press, reviewed by Daniel Akira Stadnicki
Aurality: Listening and Knowledge in Nineteenth-Century Colombia, Ana María Ochoa Gautier (2014) Durham, NC: Duke University Press, reviewed by Jessica A. Schwartz

 

For further information on the journal, please visit: https://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-Journal,id=248/

 

 

Advertisements

Publication Announcement: Theatre & Voice

Theatre & Voice by Konstantinos Thomaidis is now available on paperback and ebook formats. Part of Palgrave’s Theatre & book series, edited by Dan Rebellato and Jen Harvie, the book explores voice across genres, media and cultures, inviting the reader to reassess established ways of analysing, enjoying and listening to voice. Using a wide range of case studies integrated with critical and philosophical frameworks, it makes audible the multiple ways in which voice contributes to how we perform identities. From opera and musical theatre to live art and immersive audio walks, Konstantinos Thomaidis presents voice as plural, elusive and ripe for reinvention.

9781137552495-2

https://he.palgrave.com/page/detail/theatre-and-voice-konstantinos-thomaidis/?sf1=barcode&st1=9781137552495

Call for Papers: JIVS Special Issue ‘Voice, Identity, Contact’ (ed. Yvon Bonenfant)

CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS: JOURNAL OF INTERDISCIPLINARY VOICE STUDIES 3:2

THEMED ISSUE: ‘VOICE, IDENTITY, CONTACT’

GUEST EDITOR: YVON BONENFANT, Professor of Artistic Process, Voice and Extended Practices, University of Winchester

 

The Journal of Interdisciplinary Voice Studies invites submissions from scholars in a wide array of fields that intersect with, and/or move beyond, voice studies: such as: theatre and performance studies, musicology, sound studies, cultural studies, materiality studies, philosophical discourses, clinical voice studies, speech studies and voice and speech science to consider, and respond to, the questions in our below call.

 

We are interested in exploring emerging and exciting approaches to how we might synthesise knowledge from across the voice and sound studies field to address the below questions in interesting ways.

 

PRACTICAL ISSUES:

  1. Interested in the theme? Read the below context statement and questions, and consider sending us a draft article for peer review.
  2. We seek articles approximately 5000 words in length. However, we are open to articles longer or shorter – we will be making a final selection of articles using editorial-curatorial principles.
  3. The ‘Voicings’ section of JIVS allows for discourses that are more narrative, report-like, poetic, or experimental in nature. You can consider sending us alternative writing forms that would take us inside your response to this call. Consult back issues of the journal for examples.
  4. Send your article to: Yvon Bonenfant at yvon.bonenfant@winchester.ac.uk
  5. Deadline for articles to reach us: September 30, 2017

 

As this call follows on from a symposium in January, 2017, we are aware there may be many more articles sent to us than this volume of JIVS can contain. Know that your article may be considered for future issues of JIVS, should it be of excellent quality, but not ‘map on’ to the thematics of this volume and its final curated format.

 

QUESTIONS AND CONTEXT STATEMENT:

 

Context statement:

Voices have power. Who gets listened to matters. Moving beyond the notion of voice as metaphor, we are interested in unpicking the Foucauldian rules that seem to govern the production and perception of identity in vocal sound, beyond – or perhaps beneath – language and accent (if such dissociation is even possible).

 

The voice resists analysis, as Adriana Cavarero (2005) passionately asserts. How we hear individuals through their voicing, and how we determine what person, or kinds of people, we think we are hearing is still relatively little understood. Even from a neurological perspective, as Kreiman and Sidtis (2011) point out, the mechanisms that underpin acts of hearing voice and identifying speakers have been much less studied than the mechanisms underpinning vision. How we hear each other is neglected. What’s more, to build on Stephen Connor’s (2000) assertions, the voice is simultaneously ‘alive’ and ‘dead’, in that it is (usually) produced by living bodies, yet once it moves away from us, it but a phenomenon of physics: it becomes fields of vibration, separated from biological life, while evoking that very life in our imaginations.

 

Given that this vocal sound is a vibrational phenomenon, we might assert that the vibratory quality of the voice literally touches us (Eidsheim 2015). So, when we voice, we emit fields of vibration that come into contact with, and ‘stir up’, other bodies.  If that is the case, in a world where identity categories and their intersectionality are always at play, what might it mean to be touched by identities (perceived to be) embedded in vocal sound?  Eidsheim (2011) asserts that in the case of opera singer Marian Anderson, the perception of race in her voice was, and is, a construction of the listener; indeed, in the little psycholinguistic study that has been done on the perception of race in speech in America, people cannot reliably ‘hear’ African-Americanness without hearing verbal accent (in Kreiman and Sidtis 2011), even though there appears to be a widespread cultural belief that there is such a thing as a sounding, biologically-based,  ‘Black’ voice.  At the same time, both Bonenfant and Jarman have made different arguments about how we might hear (Jarman 2011) or feel (Bonenfant 2010) queerness in voices.  What we think we hear, what we hear, what we feel, and what we think we feel are all dance together within the perception of vocal identity.

 

  1. From your theoretical and practical viewpoints, what aspects, qualities, performances, or manifestations of vocalisation might be perceived to constitute markers of the kinds of identity we might say are derived from recent-historical notions of identity politics – for positive or for negative? In other words, what aspects of vocal sound beyond pitch and accent might cause that sound to be ‘racialised’, ‘homosexualised’, ‘gendered’, ‘classed’, otherwise ‘ethnicised’, or otherwise ‘queered’? Are these phenomena acoustically detectable? Are they really embedded within voicings, or are they constructions we ‘think’ we hear?
  2. How might these mechanisms of the attribution of qualities of identity to voices actually work?
  3. What are the consequences of these mechanisms, from your scholarly or professional perspective: aesthetically, socioculturally, biopolitically…?
  4. If, as asserts Stephen Connor via his notion of the ‘vocalic body’, we attribute (fantasized, visual, tactile) bodies to voices, what are the implications of your views in light of how bodies approach, engage with, and are willing to enter into genuine contact one another via vocalisation? How do these dynamics seem to function in your personal experience, or in your sphere of analysis, or both?
Tagged , , ,

Research Seminar by Associate Professor Virginie Magnat (UBC)

Virginie Magnat, Associate Professor of Interdisciplinary Performance at the University of British Columbia, Canada, and author of Grotowski, Women and Contemporary Performance: Meetings with Remarkable Women, presented a research seminar on her current research on voice and indigenous cultural heritage on Wednesday 7th June 2017 at the Drama Department, University of Exeter.

s200_virginie.magnat

Performance Studies, Intangible Cultural Heritage, and Indigenous Research Perspectives. 

______________________________________________________________________________ 

Virginie Magnat (University of British Columbia) 

Abstract: As a European artist-scholar from Occitaniai working at a public Canadian university located on the unceded traditional territories of First Nations communities comprised by the province of British Columbia, Virginie Magnat is committed to honoring the perspectives and contributions of Indigenous scholars and to integrating their critique of dominant Western knowledge systems into her work, as reflected in her research projects supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. Drawing from her current research activities and most recent publications, Magnat will discuss in this research seminar the potentialities and limitations of the Anglo-American performance paradigm; the epistemological and methodological implications of the “performance turn” in the social sciences; and Indigenous perspectives on embodied knowledge, agency, and identity that might propel performance studies beyond the unproductive polarity of constructivist and essentialist discursive regimes.

i Occitania is a vast and bio-culturally diverse territory extending from Bordeaux and Toulouse in southwestern France to the Piedmont valleys of Italy, and from Marseille and the Provencal Alps in southeastern France to the Aran Valley in Catalonia on the Spanish side of the Pyrenees.

Inspired by the pioneering work of Konstantinos Thomaidis, who urges performance studies scholars to “reclaim some breathing space for the contingency, temporality, presence, vulnerability and relationality of the lived voice” (2014: 84), Magnat is investigating vocality as a vital source of cultural creativity and an experiential mode of cognition grounded in process, practice, and place. Building on Diana Taylor’s articulation of intangible cultural heritage as a repertoire of embodied memory transmitted by means of performance and serving fundamental aesthetic, epistemic, and social functions (2003, 2008, 2016), Magnat argues that vocal music traditions, whose resilience crucially depends on oral transmission, epitomize the value of intangible cultural heritage. The practice-based component of her interdisciplinary research project explores whether collective vocal practice grounded in these traditions can support expressions of cultural sovereignty and self-determination while promoting inclusivity, diversity, and solidarity as the core values of a healthy multicultural society.

Drawing from her twenty-five years of experience with physically-based performance practice and vocal training, as well as from the embodied research she has been conducting on the Occitan vocal music tradition of her Mediterranean cultural legacy, Magnat is collaborating with an Indigenous Advisory Committee composed of seven Elders/Traditional Knowledge Keepers and artist-scholars, as well as with two Indigenous and two non-Indigenous graduate students pursuing MFA and PhD degrees in Theatre and Performance Studies, Indigenous Studies, and Ethnomusicology. Together, they are facilitating “singing circles” that engage Indigenous, Settler, and Immigrant communities in non-colonial collective vocal practice hinging upon the Indigenous ethical principles of respect, reciprocity, and relationality (Wilson 2008). With their potential for transformation, these cross-cultural and intergenerational gatherings constitute powerful utopian performatives that contribute to current reconciliation processes in Canada.

Bibliography: 

Dolan, Jill. Utopia in Performance: Finding Hope at the Theater. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2005.
Magnat, Virginie. “Occitan Music Revitalization as Radical Cultural Activism: From Postcolonial Regionalism to Altermondialisation,” Popular Music and Society 40:1 (2017), 61-74.
– – -. “Decolonizing Performance Research.ˮ Special issue on performance studies edited by Marie Pecorari, Etudes anglaises 69/2 (2016): 135-148.
– – -. Grotowski, Women, and Contemporary Performance: Meetings with Remarkable Women. Routledge Advances in Theatre and Performance Studies. London and New York: Routledge, 2014.
Taylor, Diana. Saving the ‛Live’? Re-Performance and Intangible Cultural Heritage. Études Anglaises 69/2 (2016): 149-161.
– – -. “Performance and Intangible Cultural Heritage.” The Cambridge Companion to Performance Studies. Ed. Tracy C. Davis. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2008. 91-104.
– – -. The Archive and the Repertoire: Performing Cultural Memory in the Americas. Durham: Duke University Press, 2003.
Thomaidis, Konstantinos. Theatre & Voice. London and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
– – -. Voice Studies: Critical Approaches to Process, Performance and Experience. London and New York: Routledge, 2015.
– – -. “The Revocalization of Logos? Thinking, Doing and Disseminating Voice.” Studies in Musical Theatre 8: 1 (2014). 77–87.
Wilson, Shawn. Research is Ceremony: Indigenous Research Methods. Halifax and Winnipeg: Fernwood, 2008.

Bio: 

Virginie Magnat is Associate Professor of Performance at the University of British Columbia. She works at the intersection of performances studies, cultural anthropology, experimental ethnography, and Indigenous research methodologies. Her publications have appeared in North American and international scholarly journals as well as edited collections in the fields of theatre and performance studies, anthropology, ethnomusicology, sociology, qualitative inquiry, and literary criticism in English, French, Polish, Italian, and Spanish. Her monograph Grotowski, Women, and Contemporary Performance: Meetings with Remarkable Women (Routledge 2014) and its companion documentary film series, featured on the Routledge Performance Archive, are grounded in four years of embodied research and multi-sited fieldwork supported by two major research grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

Her new research project The Performative Power of Vocality and the arts-based community engagement initiative Honoring Cultural Diversity through Collective Vocal Practice, also funded by two SSHRC grants, explore vocality as a vital source of human creativity and an embodied mode of cognition grounded in process, practice, and place, as well as a form of social and political agency. The main research outcomes will be her second monograph contracted by Routledge and the creation of a film documenting the practice-based research component that will be hosted on the UBC Institute for Community Engaged Research website (http://icer.ok.ubc.ca/welcome.html).


 

The Research Seminar was part of Virginie Magnat’s ongoing collaboration with Konstantinos Thomaidis, which is currently centred around the special issue of JIVS Voicing Belonging: Traditional Singing in a Globalized World. We wish to thank the College of Humanities at the University of Exeter for sponsoring the visit with a Visiting International Academic Fellowship grant and the Drama Department for generous technical and administrative support.

Voice Workshop in Tallinn, Estonia

Dr Konstantinos Thomaidis led an intensive voice workshop as a visiting tutor for the MA Physical Theatre and Theatre Pedagogy at the Estonian Academy of Music and Theatre, Tallinn, Estonian (15th-19th May 2017).

The workshop drew on principles of Konstantinos’s work on intersubjective voice pedagogy and, specifically developing his work on relational resonance, culminated in an open presentation of choral extracts from Greek tragedy.

Estonia Workshop

For further information:

http://www.ema.edu.ee

http://www.ema.edu.ee/konstantinos-thomaidise-meistrikursused-emta-lavakunstikoolis/

http://lavakas.ee/index.php?sisu=0&mida=746

CIVS wishes to thank Juri Nael for the invitation and for oganising the visit, and Marie Kolle-Laur for administrative support.

Journal of Interdisciplinary Voice Studies 2.1

The Centre for Interdisciplinary Voice Studies is delighted to announce the publication of issue 2.1 of the Journal of Interdisciplinary Voice Studies.

Contributions to this general issue evidence the development of the field of voice studies in various thematic and methodological directions and include:

ARTICLES

‘The voice of eloquence in Kenneth Burke’s rhetoric and its implications for advertising performance’ by Joshua Hill https://doi.org/10.1386/jivs.2.1.7_1

‘Horrorism in the scene of torture: Reading Scarry with Cavarero’ by Timothy J. Huzar https://doi.org/10.1386/jivs.2.1.25_1

‘Children who stutter find their voice onstage and off: The SAY approach to stuttering’ by Ellen Mareneck https://doi.org/10.1386/jivs.2.1.45_1

VOICINGS

‘Space, shape and the Physio-Vocal instrument’ by Robert Lewis https://doi.org/10.1386/jivs.2.1.57_1

‘Tracing voice through the career of a musical pioneer: A conversation with Pauline Oliveros’ by Gelsey Bell and Pauline Oliveros https://doi.org/10.1386/jivs.2.1.67_1

REVIEWS

The Art of Voice Synthesis Symposium, Amsterdam, 11–13 May 2016 http://www.artificialvoice.nl/

The Late Voice: Time, Age, and Experience in Popular Music, Richard Elliott (2015) New York and London: Bloomsbury Publishing Inc., 289 pp., ISBN: 9781628921182, h/bk, $120; e-book, $107.99

Beyond Words: Sobs, Hums, Stutters and Other Vocalizations, Steven Connor (2014) London: Reaktion Books, 240 pp., ISBN: 9781780232584, h/bk, £25.00

Sensing Sound: Singing and Listening as Vibrational Practice, Nina Sun Eidsheim (2015) Durham: Duke University Press, 270 pp., ISBN: 9780822360469, h/bk, $89.95; ISBN: 9780822360612, p/bk, $24.95

Voices in the Media: Performing French Linguistic Otherness, Gaelle Planchenault (2015) London: Bloomsbury, 210 pp., ISBN: 9781472588029, £75.00

Reviews Authors:  Francesco Bentivegna And  Katherine Meizel And  Brandon LaBelle And  Rebecca Lentjes And  Walid Benkhaled

https://doi.org/10.1386/jivs.2.1.79_5

You can read Ben Macpherson’s editorial here: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/intellect/jivs/2017/00000002/00000001/art00001

 

 

 

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Roy Hart Voice Workshops by Margaret Pikes

CIVS collaborator Margaret Pikes will be delivering workshops on Roy Hart Voice Work later this year. Please see below for further information:

 

ROY HART VOICE WORK

www.royhartstimme-koeln.com

 

LONDON – Bethnal Green

Eastbourne House Arts, Bullards Place, London E2 0PT

WORKSHOP: VOICE and IMPROVISATION

29 and 30 April 2017 11:00 to 17:00

 

Margaret Pikes (ROY HART voice teacher) will lead this course with Kate Hilder, performer, Action Theatre (TM) teacher and Feldenkraistrainer: www.katehilder.com/

 

Exploring our voices can be a doorway to words and language. We will discover how connecting with the sources from which we produce vocal sound and listening to the qualities and musicality of our voice can generate narrative content. Kate and Margaret will teach in tandem starting each day with a physical and vocal warmup followed by solo, duet and small group improvisations. Margaret will then lead a session centering on vocal work which arises from these improvisations, including short individual guidance. At other times we will start with vocal improvising and then explore movement and mood to fill out the different characters which emerge.

This course is open to participants who have already worked with Margaret or Kate, or who have some experience of Voice/body/improvisation practice.

Cost: £150 (or £130 if a £50 deposit received before 3rd April.)

For more information or to enrol contact Kate Hilder: katejhilder@gmail.com

 

________________________________________________________________________

 

ROY HART VOICE WORK

S.W. FRANCE

at the Hameau de l’Etoile (Nr. Montpellier) in a wild and beautiful setting.

www.hameaudeletoile.com/en

 

VOICE– BODY INTENSIVE (Intermediate/Advanced Level) 6 day residential Workshop

6 – 11 AUGUST 2017

led by Margaret Pikes (ROY HART voice teacher) with

Neil Paris director, ex-Fabulous Beast performer, teacher and artistic director of SMITHdancetheatre http://www.smithdancetheatre.co.uk/

 

This course is open to participants interested in the Roy Hart approach to developing the range of vocal expression and who have some experience of voice and body work. ROY HART voice work offers a way to experience and develop a deeper connection to your own unique vocal potential. Because vocal sound has its source in the body as well as in the world of our emotions, play and movement can often unexpectedly free up vocal possibilities that lie hidden and unexpressed.

 

Margaret will lead this workshop with Neil Paris. Guided by these two very experienced and supportive teachers, participants in this workshop will explore and develop awareness of the dynamic sources of the voice in the body and the imagination. In the mornings, we will focus on individual voices and movement, then in the afternoons on group improvisation, play and the development of individual themes including work on texts or singing songs.

 

Full board and lodging must be booked separately at the Hameau de l’Etoile, prices starting from 65€ per night. Participants will then be able to relax between classes in a beautiful, wild setting, enjoying comfortable accommodation, excellent food (full board) and unlimited use of the large swimming pool. (Having this time and space to absorb the day’s work, can be particularly helpful on such an intensive course.)

Price of workshop (36 hours): .

Early bird price: 540€ if deposit of 120€ received before 1 March 201. After this date the price is 580€ .

Maximum number of participants: 12

(Accommodation not included in this price.)

Contact Margaret by email for more detailed information and to enroll.

mpikes2000@yahoo.com

www.royhartstimme-koeln.com

Tagged , , , ,

Call for Papers and Symposium Announcement: Voice and Identity – Touches, Textures, Timbres

Call for contributions

Voice and Identity – Touches, Textures, Timbres:   A Symposium

 

Where and When:

Saturday 28 January, 10 am to 3.30 pm. University of Winchester, Winchester SO22 4NR, in room St Alphege 301. Train connection from Waterloo 1 hour, direct, with frequent services. The room is a 15 minute walk from the station.

Cost: Free, with lunch provided.

 

Confirmed morning presenters (see bios at bottom of call):

  • Yvon Bonenfant (University of Winchester) (convenor) – on the relationship between voice-styling, hairstyling, and the tactile register
  • Regina N. Bradley (Armstrong State University, Georgia) – on theorizing sound as sites of southern black women storytelling in America
  • Freya Jarman (University of Liverpool) – on lost sounds and the sound of loss
  • Roberta Mock (Plymouth University) – on the historic voice of the Jewish American woman in comedy
  • Jennifer Stoever (State University of New York at Binghamton) –  on the historic racialization of the voice and listening in a US context
  • Konstantinos Thomaidis (University of Exeter) – on how voice and identity are interrogated in forensic contexts

 

Call for contributions

We ask for 5, 10 or 15 minute responses to the following stimuli:

  1. From your theoretical and practical viewpoints, what aspects, qualities, performances, or manifestations of vocalisation might constitute markers of the kinds of identity we might say are derived from recent-historical notions of identity politics – for positive or for negative? In other words, what aspects of vocal sound beyond pitch and accent might cause that sound to be ‘racialised’, ‘homosexualised’, ‘gendered’, ‘classed’, otherwise ‘ethnicised’, or otherwise ‘queered’? Are these ‘real’, sonic phenomena embedded within voices, or are they constructions we ‘think’ we hear?
  1. How might these mechanisms of the attribution of qualities of identity to voices work?
  2. What are the consequences of these mechanisms, from your scholarly or professional perspective?
  1. If, as asserts Stephen Connor via his notion of the ‘vocalic body’, we attribute (fantasized, visual, tactile) bodies to voices, what are the implications of your views in light of how bodies contact one another via vocalisation? How do these dynamics seem to function in your personal experience, or in your sphere of analysis, or both?

 

Context statement:

Voices have power. Who gets listened to matters. Moving beyond the preoccupation with voice as metaphor, we are interested in unpicking the Foucauldian rules that seem to govern the production and perception of identity in vocal sound, beyond – or perhaps beneath – language and accent (if such dissociation is even possible).

Our panel thus bring together scholars from musicology, theatre and performance studies, literary and cultural studies, practice-research, and sound studies to explore the below provocations and open up discussion.  In line with the Centre for Interdisciplinary Voice Studies’ ambitions, we invite contributions from across the creative arts, humanities, hard sciences and health sciences.

The voice resists analysis, as Adriana Cavarero (2005) passionately asserts. How we hear individuals through their voicing, and how we determine what person, or kinds of people, we think we are hearing is still relatively little understood. Even from a neurological perspective, as Kreiman and Sidtis (2011) point out, the mechanisms that underpin acts of hearing voice and identifying speakers have been much less studied than the mechanisms underpinning vision. How we hear each other is neglected. What’s more, to build on Stephen Connor’s (2000) assertions, the voice is simultaneously ‘alive’ and ‘dead’, in that it is (usually) produced by living bodies, yet once it moves away from us, it but a phenomenon of physics: it becomes fields of vibration, separated from biological life, while evoking that very life in our imaginations.

Given that this vocal sound is a vibrational phenomenon, we might assert that the vibratory quality of the voice literally touches us (Eidsheim 2015). So, when we voice, we emit fields of vibration that come into contact with, and ‘stir up’, other bodies.  If that is the case, in a world where identity categories and their intersectionality are always at play, what might it mean to be touched by identities (perceived to be) embedded in vocal sound?  Eidsheim (2011) asserts that in the case of opera singer Marian Anderson, the perception of race in her voice was, and is, a construction of the listener; indeed, in the little psycholinguistic study that has been done on the perception of race in speech in America, people cannot reliably ‘hear’ African-Americanness without hearing verbal accent (in Kreiman and Sidtis 2011), even though there appears to be a widespread cultural belief that there is such a thing as a sounding, biologically-based,  ‘Black’ voice.  At the same time, both Bonenfant and Jarman have made different arguments about how we might hear (Jarman 2011) or feel (Bonenfant 2010) queerness in voices.  What we think we hear, what we hear, what we feel, and what we think we feel are all dance together within the perception of vocal identity.

 

Shape of the day:

The morning session, from 10-12.30, will be made up of presentations from the six invited panellists, with integrated discussion, followed further facilitated discussion. Each panellist will be responding to the stimuli questions above, with reference to their specialist fields and interest.  The presentations will be more speculative than usual, and panellists may elect to be interviewed rather than present formal papers. Attendees may be sent short (don’t worry! We’ll keep it under control!) excerpts of preparatory reading, listening or viewing to allow for us to all have common ground before the discussion begins.

The afternoon session is open to attendees to present their own responses to the questions above, and will run from 1.30-3 pm, followed by a 30 minute discussion.  Not all attendees are required to develop a presentation.

 

To propose a presentation:

 Develop a 200-300 word abstract in response to the questions in the call, and send it to Yvon Bonenfant, convenor of the symposium, at the below address.  Specify whether your presentation will be 5, 10 or 15 minutes long, and of what it will consist (live speech, sound files, song, silent speech, mediated speech, etc.)  Your presentation may be performative, allowing for you to enrich your presentation with your own (or someone else’s) vocality. To keep to time, however, we will not be providing amplification. If you wish to bring your own voice manipulation system, be it corporeal or digitally mediated, you are welcome to do so. You may also prepare a sound file in advance and have it played in lieu of presentation, or both.

 

To propose attendance without presentation:

Let us know in about 100 words why this symposium matters to you. PhD students who want to attend without presenting will still be eligible for £40 subsidies on a first-come, first-served basis.

 

Travel assistance for PhD students:

We are attributing five £40 travel subsidies to interested PhD students across disciplines. If you are presenting as a PhD student, please mark that you are seeking the subsidy on your submission.

 

Attendee numbers: 

Attendance will be strictly limited to 30 persons in total, including morning panellists, to ensure discussion can take place.

 

Publication:

The symposium will serve as a starting point for the development of peer-reviewed articles for a themed volume of the Journal of Interdisciplinary Voice Studies.

 

Deadline:

Please propose by 15 December.  Depending on the number and foreseen duration of presentations, some may take place on line rather than at the symposium. You will receive a response to your proposal before 23 December.  If you need a response earlier for funding purposes, contact us.

 

Any media (PowerPoint presentations, video, audio files, etc.) must be ready by 15 January. It will be pre-loaded to our presentation system to save time.

 

Send your proposal or other queries to:

yvon.bonenfant@winchester.ac.uk

 

Short bios of confirmed contributors:

Yvon Bonenfant is Professor of Artistic Process, Voice and Extended Practices at the University of Winchester. He is interested in what the voice can do when it does not do what it usually does: from this, he makes work and writes. He recently co-founded Tract and Touch – www.tractandtouch.com.

Regina N. Bradley  is Assistant Professor of African American Literature at Armstrong State University in Savannah, Ga. Her research interests include post-Civil Rights African American Literature, Hip Hop, and the Contemporary Black American South. She can be reached at www.redclayscholar.com.

Freya Jarman is Senior Lecturer in Music at the University of Liverpool. She writes across a range of musical genres through a critical lens heavily informed by queer theory, and is currently working on a wide-ranging gendered history of singing high notes.

Roberta Mock is Professor of Performance Studies and Director of the Graduate School at Plymouth University. Her theoretical, historical and practical research tends to focus on gender, sexuality and the body in performance, with a particular focus on women in stand up and live art.

Jennifer Stoever is Associate Professor of English at the State University of New York at Binghamton where she teaches courses on 19th and 20th century African American literature, popular music, and sound studies.  She is co-founder and editor-in-chief of Sounding Out!: The Sound Studies Blog and author of The Sonic Color Line: Race and the Cultural Politics of Listening (NYU Press, 2016).

Konstantinos Thomaidis is Lecturer in Drama/Theatre/Performance at the University of Exeter. He is joint founder of the Centre for Interdisciplinary Voice Studies, and joint editor of both the Journal of Interdisciplinary Voice Studies . With Ben Macpherson, he co-edited Voice Studies: Critical Approaches to Process, Performance and Experience (Routledge 2015).

 

Supported by:

Centre for Interdisciplinary Voice Studies; University of Winchester; Journal of Interdisciplinary Voice Studies, and the institutions of our confirmed speakers.

 

Tagged , , , , ,

Voicing Belonging: Traditional Singing in a Globalized World

Special Issue of the Journal of Interdisciplinary Voice Studies

‘Voicing Belonging: Traditional Singing in a Globalized World’

Editors: Konstantinos Thomaidis and Virginie Magnat

 

Why conduct scholarly and artistic research on traditional singing in the global age? Given the dominance of new communication technologies and the unprecedented commodification of world cultures, investigating vocal practices rooted in oral cultures and traditional ways of knowing may seem futile and irrelevant. Yet, traditional singing is a powerful mode of human creativity, and traditional songs comprise a significant part of what UNESCO has designated as ‘our’ shared intangible cultural heritage. Current debates on cultural diversity demonstrate that rethinking regional, national, transnational, and global notions of cultural identity is becoming increasingly urgent if we are to acknowledge and value the world’s biocultural diversity beyond borders that separate and delineate nation-states, whose sovereignty continues to hinge upon legitimizing constructions of national identity. If, as Caroline Bithell reminds us in Transported by Song, ‘the act of singing with others is clearly about far more than simply producing sound’ (2007: xxx-xxxi), how does engaging in singing practices relate to emergent, unstable and conflicting versions of belonging in times of precarity?

 

This special issue asks what is at stake today in cultural revitalization initiatives, academic research projects, and artistic endeavours that seek to reawaken, restore, preserve, transmit, and at times transform specific vocal traditions whose continuity, resilience, and vitality crucially depend on a repertoire of embodied cultural memory that, as Diana Taylor argues in The Archive and the Repertoire (2003), must be performed in order to remain efficacious and meaningful. This performative dimension is a core concern for our special issue since live performance allows for infinite variations linked to the subtleties of interpretation characterizing orally transmitted vocal practices that, as evidenced in Tenzer and Roeder’s Analytical and Cross-Cultural Studies in World Music (2011), elude the standard Western notation system. When dynamically reactivated through performance, can cultural memory embedded in these songs—which are often the only remaining vehicle for endangered languages—reveal the contemporary relevance and future potentialities of intangible cultural heritage?

JIVS

We are calling for contributions from researchers, practitioners, educators, and activists who can reflexively address their positionality when engaging with questions of cultural identity and tradition, and who can critically account for processes of acculturation, identity construction, and musical regionalism linked to the re-appropriation of traditional vocal practices as well as to phenomena of interculturality, hybridity, and fusion.

 

Topics for article submissions can include but are not limited to:

  • Interdisciplinary investigations of traditional singing as a source of knowledge; Contemporary research methodologies of traditional singing; Traditional singing and voice philosophy
  • The dis- or re-embodied voice: intersections of traditional singing and technology; Traditional singing on stage/film/sound art
  • Ecologies of singing: the aesthetics of spatiality, silence and sound; Transmitting traditional songs to sustain bio-cultural diversity in the global age
  • Autobiography, adaptation and translation through song
  • Re-imagining vocal traditions: from folk revival to world music; Producing and circulating world voices for a globalized audience; Vocal traditions as intangible cultural heritage; Re-examining notions of ‘folk’, ‘authenticity’ and ‘tradition’ in singing practice
  • Traditional songs as training in the conservatoire or Higher Education
  • Traditional singing, subjectivity, the nation, ethnicity and racial politics; Indigenous perspectives on the cultural and political relevance of traditional singing; Performing traditional songs as a form of postcolonial/transnational/radical cultural activism; Intercultural, transnational, diasporic and migratory aesthetics of vocal practice
  • Traditional singing as a form of spiritual practice

 

Practitioner-scholars who work in the areas outlined in the CfP are invited to contribute to the ‘Voicings’ section of the journal, which offers a platform for experimentation with non-conventional forms of dissemination, such as:

  • Practitioners’ reflections
  • Vocal scores and transcripts of music/sound/audio/multimedia artworks
  • Annotated interviews
  • Photographic essays
  • Excerpts of rehearsals, workshops, performances
  • Voice essays and blog-style contributions
  • Transcripts of roundtables
  • Academic discussions of voice in the form of poetic scripts, libretti, mini lexicons, ethnographic notes
  • Voice-related documents and archives
  • Extended and/or comparative documentations of exhibitions, conferences, events or performances

Proposals (350-500 words max.) should be emailed to both editors by 11th July 2016 at konstantinos.thomaidis@port.ac.uk and virginie.magnat@ubc.ca. Successful authors will be invited to submit their contributions by 3rd October 2016. Articles and Voicings will appear in the Spring Issue of the journal, subject to peer-review.

 

Please visit http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-Journal,id=248/ for more information on the Journal of Interdisciplinary Voice Studies, and http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/MediaManager/File/style%20guide(journals)-1.pdf, for guidelines on Intellect’s House Style.

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Journal of Interdisciplinary Voice Studies 1.2: Voice and/as Devising

We are delighted to announce the publication of the first themed issue of the Journal of Interdisciplinary Voice Studies on the topic of ‘Voice and/as Devising.’

JIVS

 

Contents:

From voice-body to sound-body: A phenomenological approach to the voice 
pp. 117-130(14)
Author: Wilkins, Caroline

This article concerns some phenomenological aspects of the voice with regard to an emergent form of performance embraced by the term Sound Theatre.

(Re)authoring the 27 club: Bewildered voices, acousmatic audiophilia and the dangers of listening-in

pp. 131-142 (12)

Author: Macpherson, Ben

This article considers the limits, layers and potential of vocal mimesis in the creation and performance of a new musical theatre work, All That’s Left – a musical that performed imagined conversations between pop-culture icons from ‘The 27 Club.’

Extended vocal technique and Joan La Barbara: The relational ethics of voice on the edge of intelligibility 
pp. 143-159(17)
Author: Bell, Gelsey

This article explores vocalist and composer Joan La Barbara’s use of extended vocal technique, and its implications for imagining new kinds of ethical and political relationality with the voice.

Singing research: Judaica 1 at The British Library 
pp. 161-172(12)
Author: Spatz, Ben

This article analyses a performance of Judaica 1 at The British Library in London, part of an ongoing research project to investigate the embodied technique of contemporary (Jewish) identity using a ‘laboratory’ methodology of post-Grotowskian songaction.

Voice in devising/devising through voice: A conversation with Mikhail Karikis, Elaine Mitchener and Jessica Walker 
pp. 173-182(10)
Authors: Karikis, Mikhail; Mitchener, Elaine; Walker, Jessica; Thomaidis, Konstantinos

In what ways is voice conceived and practised as material? In providing answers to such questions, this multi-vocal interview/roundtable transcript is composed around the responses of three contemporary vocal artists based in the United Kingdom, Mikhail Karikis, Elaine Mitchener and Jessica Walker, in conversation with Konstantinos Thomaidis.

Vocalizing Nothingness: (Re)configuring vocality inside the spacetime of Ottavia

pp. 183-195 (13)

Author: Belgrano, Elisabeth

The purpose of this Voicing is to stage an event where Nothingness becomes a part of a singer’s conscious process into an historical vocal manuscript.
Uluzuzulalia and the ‘Your Vivacious Voice’ project: A first report on collaborating with scientists to elicit children’s extra-normal voices 
pp. 197-209(13)
Author: Bonenfant, Yvon

This report article describes some of the key drivers that underpinned the project, articulates some of its results and makes a short, initial assessment of some of the challenges faced by the creative team and the respective solutions that were explored.

This issue concludes with four book reviews: http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-Article,id=21731/ 

To find out more about the journal please click here

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,